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Kinds of tea


All teas, whether they are green, black or of the so-called oolong type are made from the same plant, Camellia sinensis. The difference between these types of teas depends on whether they have been fermented or not, and if the former is the case, how much they have been fermented. Green teas are not fermented.
Here we show the various kinds of Japanese green teas as well as an Oolong and a black tea: for comparison.

Kinds of tea
Green tea(non-fermented)
Oolong tea
Black tea
Kinds of tea
Tencha
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Gyokuro
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Kabusecha
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Kukicha
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Mecha
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Konacha
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Kawayanagi
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Sencha
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Bancha
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Tama Ryokucha
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Hojicha
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Genmaicha
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Please click the tea name to which @ mark adheres to display the image.
 
Tencha (Matcha)
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Tencha
(Matcha)

The sprouting tea bush is covered with reeds, straw or an artificial fiber screen for more than 20 days. The freshly picked tea leaves are steamed and dried without rolling. Later, stalks and veins are removed and the remaining soft leaf tissue is ground into a fine powder, Matcha, by a stone mill.

Gyokuro
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Gyokuro

This tea is cultivated in the same way as Tencha. The freshly picked tea leaves are steamed and dried with rolling.

Kabusecha
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Kabusecha

This tea is in a category between Gyokuro and Sencha. The tea bushes are covered with a simple screen of straw or artificial fiber for a few days only. The harvested leaves are processed in the same way as Gyokuro.

Sencha
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Sencha

After picking the tea leaves, the processing is the same as for Gyokuro. Most teas in Japan are of this type.

Strong Sencha
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Strong Sencha

This tea has a stronger flavour and aroma than ordinary Sencha.



Teas made of the different leaf parts removed during the processing of Gyokuro, Kabusecha and Sencha. Similar leaf parts are used for each type but with different flavours depending on the base tea.

Kukicha
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Kukicha
(This tea is made from Gyokuro)

This tea is made from the stalks. Also called Karigane, Boucha or Shiraore.

Mecha
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Mecha
(This tea is made from Gyokuro)

This tea is made from the small undeveloped top leaves which are curved and rolled. Also called Jinko.

Konacha
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Konacha
(This tea is made from Gyokuro)

This tea is made from the dust from the processing.

Kawayanagi
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Kawayanagi
(This tea is made from Kabusecha)

This tea is made from the thick and large leaves sorted out during the processing of Kabusecha and Sencha.

Bancha
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Bancha

After the picking of the young first flush leaves, older leaves are harvested and then cut, steamed and sun-dried. Also called Kyobancha.
Green teas with added processing

Hojicha
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Hojicha

This is roasted Sencha and Kawayanagi.

Genmaicha
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Genmaicha
(This tea is made from Kabusecha)

A blend of Kabusecha, Sencha, Kawayanagi and roasted brown rice.
We are blending premium hard brown rice with Kabusecha to prevent the popped rice to float to the surface when hot water is poured on.

Genmaicha
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Genmaicha
(This tea is made from Kawayanagi)

We are blending premium hard brown rice with Kawayanagi to prevent the popped rice to float to the surface when hot water is poured on.

Pan-fired Tama Ryokucha
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Pan-fired Tama Ryokucha (Chinese style)

This tea is fired, not steamed, and then softly rolled to a curved shape. Mainly produced in Kyushu.

Steamed Tama Ryokucha
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Steamed Tama Ryokucha (Japanese style)

This tea is first steamed and then fired before being softly rolled to a curved shape. Mainly produced in Kyushu.

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